The possibility of landing a media interview with a client is exciting, but the window for making it happen can be limited – so it’s important to coordinate efficiently. In my experience, some have been relatively simple to coordinate, in which I shared some contact information and availability, but others have been a bit more complex, in which I served a greater role in rounding everyone up. Either way, here are some tips that I think anyone beginning to coordinate media interviews could benefit from checking out:

 

1. Determine as many logistics as you can beforehand.

Factors like client availability, reporter availability, and the best format for your client to do the interview are key for coordination. You don’t want to promise the reporter a face-to-face interview if your client can only speak over the phone. Figuring out as many crucial details before you coordinate an interview can help save everyone time – and will help your reporter meet their deadline.

2. Then, double-check the logistics.

I recently coordinated an interview that involved key players from different time zones, so it was crucial that I kept my times straight when coordinating. Reread those emails, look over calendars, and make sure everything matches up.

3. Do your research on the reporter and their past work.

The reporter you’re working with may have written about your client’s industry in the past. Read some of their articles to see a potential angle they might take in the interview. Would they probably support your client’s efforts, or could they be skeptical? This can help anticipate potential interview questions, which will help you prepare your client.

4. Don’t be afraid to ask what type of story the reporter may be interested in.

Similar to the previous point, it doesn’t hurt to see what aspect of the story interests the reporter. Is it the CEO’s upbringing and success story? Or, is it the current state of the company’s profits? You’ll probably have an idea already, but asking about the reporter’s area of interest can help you both prepare your client and make sure the reporter is learning about what matters to them.

 

Want to see more of what we have to say? Check out some of the other Commonwealth PR blog posts here.